Linda Ronstadt Suffering From Parkinson’s Disease

Posted 23 Aug 2013 in Music + TV News, Uncategorized

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This has been known in some industry circles for sometime. Now Ms. Ronstadt has gone public via a piece in AARP

From AARP Blog

Legendary singer Linda Ronstadt, 67, told AARP today that she “can’t sing a note” because she suffers from Parkinson’s disease. Diagnosed eight months ago, Ronstadt began to show symptoms as long as eight years ago. But she ascribed her inability to sing to a tick bite (“my health has never recovered since then”), and believed the shaking in her hands resulted from shoulder surgery.

In a wide-ranging interview with AARP’s music writer Alanna Nash to be published on aarp.org next week, Ronstadt revealed how she discovered that “there was something wrong” with her voice.

I couldn’t sing,” she told Nash, “and I couldn’t figure out why. I knew it was mechanical. I knew it had to do with the muscles, but I thought it might have also had something to do with the tick disease that I had. And it didn’t occur to me to go to a neurologist. I think I’ve had it for seven or eight years already, because of the symptoms that I’ve had. Then I had a shoulder operation, so I thought that’s why my hands were trembling.

“Parkinson’s is very hard to diagnose, so when I finally went to a neurologist and he said, ‘Oh, you have Parkinson’s disease,’ I was completely shocked. I wouldn’t have suspected that in a million, billion years.

“No one can sing with Parkinson’s disease,” Ronstadt said. “No matter how hard you try.”

Ronstadt walks with the aid of poles when on uneven ground, and uses a wheelchair when she travels.

Although Ronstadt’s new memoir, Simple Dreams, will appear on September 17, it does not discuss her diagnosis, or the loss of her voice.

Ronstadt, who dated high profile men such as California Gov. Jerry Brown and George Lucas, helped shape the folk-rock music scene of the late 1960s and early 1970s. She started as lead singer of the Stone Poneys, then went on to achieve fame as a solo performer. She has earned 11 Grammy Awards, two Academy of Country Music awards, and an Emmy. Her albums have gone gold, platinum and multi-platinum.

On Saturday, Michael Nesmith who wrote “Different Drum” released this statement via his facebook page: 

“The awful news about Linda losing her voice to Parkinson’s is terrible but it can never diminish the legacy she has created for us in the songs she has sung for all of us. Because of her these songs will live as long as people listen to songs and these songs will always sing with the same power and beauty that she was and is.

Like all great gifts, these songs now sing to her as they once sang with her. Listen to them. You will hear what she has done. What she has given us. Her voice is far from stilled. It lives and sings forever down the halls of time. Please-visit-and-LIKE-our-facebook-page

Linda did more for “Different Drum” than I ever did — or ever could have. She breathed eternal life into it.”

BELOW IS “Different Drum” FOLLOWED BY ADDITIONAL FAVORITES 

Posted by Larry Carta

4 Comments

  1. Jim McCabe (23 Aug 2013, 18:47)
    Reply

    What a shame. I’m not a fan of her tunes, but her California hippie chick persona was always very intriguing. Good luck Linda.

  2. Damon Noga (23 Aug 2013, 19:32)
    Reply

    How sad, brings tears to my eyes. May God Bless you Linda.

  3. drkrick (23 Aug 2013, 20:02)
    Reply

    I am a fan of many of her tunes, and so sorry to hear this news. Kind of odd that AARP chose to put her dating resume ahead of her many musical accomplishments in the background paragraph.

  4. Phil Lucafo (24 Aug 2013, 18:00)
    Reply

    This is one of the saddest things I’ve heard in a long time. My wife knows I’ve had a crush on her for many years. What’s not to love about that angelic voice and innocent persona. I loved her her whole career and I still do today. She will always be in my heart as the greatest female pop/ country/ rock singer of all time. There is no better voice in the business. God bless you Linda,



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